Coca cola and content

Coca Cola have set out their stall on content marketing. There's a useful summary blog here if you're in a hurry but I have also embedded both films below.  There's jargon a plenty but what Coca Cola ingenuously avoid is looking too closely at two core ideas: they want to double the amount of Coca Cola they are selling globally and 2/ they want to add to the sum of human culture.  Apparently if they do 2 then 1 will follow inexorably. My problem with this is that human culture is not dominated by 'conversations' about fizzy drinks. Don't get me wrong – thirst is universal but thirst related conversations aren't. As the strategy unfolds with talk about link tests, in-market testing and liquid ideas I am uncomfortable about the idea that Coca cola through active listening increase their share of culture ideas. I do accept that it may be possible for them to increase their share of Coc  acola related conversations (but not that much) -  Are their customers are allowed to talk about the product or do Coca cola want to do all the talking?  

 

 

Breaking out of the category and talking about universal ideas is a great idea – I just don't think Coca cola can do it without reminding us of what is the real thing. Otherwise the ROIs started looking bad.

What if your customers talk about things you'd rather not talk about – how are you going to develop the conversation? The language of Coca cola looks postcolonial to me. This isn't opening up conversations but using big bucks to amplify a narrow range of campaign topics and to actively close others down. Dissidents will be suppressed.  The whole point of content marketing is to follow and amplify the themese which genuinely engage people not to turn your own agenda away from ads to advertorial from people who turn out not to be genuine customers at all.  

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