Passion narratives and talent

Gardot2 The human need for stories is so deep that if your aspiring star has suffered enough then create a passion narrative – that will create enough traction to give them cutthrough.  I spotted this film about the very talented Melody Gardot on the CBS news site. And in case you hadn't time to see the film there was an article- there too. From which I established the following. She's from Philadelphia (though I would have thought her French from the name). She's big in France. And she's in constant pain. In fact we're told the only time she's NOT in pain is when she's on stage. She got knocked off her bicycle some years ago. Since then she has to walk with a cane. She is extraordinarily senstive to light. And to sound.  So she wears dark glasses a lot. And music was key to her recovery. On film they even took her back to her surgeon so he could attest that her recovery was miraculous and down to music. Cue a little brain science talk.

Now I have no reason to doubt the truth of any of this. Its the construction of the story around suffering that interests me. The notion that performing is an act of generosity on her part and that this raises the quality of the music she makes to a higher plane. Which makes listening to her an asthetic experience which is almost moral in quality. This is marketing hogwash but I find it compelling. Its a reminder that passion narratives are not exclusively religious but have magical qualities when they are used.

Western societies have a problem with suffering. It is claimed to be the biggest barrier to faith. Passion narratives are a reminder that people also think of suffering as transformative. So not always evil or pointless then.  Youtube won't let me embed any videos so here's a link. Very lovely.

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